General Guidelines

  1. Technical terms should either be italicized or put in double quotation marks while quotes from other sources cited in the manuscript should be in single quotation marks. However, if the quoted material is more than three typed-out lines, it should be marked off from the main text and indented on both sides with 0.5 tab margins and should appear without quotation marks, immediately followed by the in-text parenthetical citation of the source material.

  2. If the author is quoting more than three lines from the verse of a poem, it is to be marked from the main text, and indented with a 0.5 tab margin. If the quoted material is less than three lines, the quoted material is to be included in the main text within single quotation marks and the lines of the quoted verse are to be separated using ‘/’ between them (for instance, ‘For there's more enterprise/ In walking naked’) and is to be immediately followed by parenthetical citation of the source material.

  3. If the author is quoting dialogues from a drama that is taking place between the characters of the play then it is to be marked from the main text, and indented with a 0.5 tab margins. If it is a single dialogue quoted and the quote does not run for more than two lines, it is to be included in the main text in single quotes and is to be immediately followed by parenthetical citation of the source material.

  4. Omissions in the middle of the cited quote must be marked by ellipses within square brackets, as […]. All alterations within the quoted materials made by the author for the sake of providing a sense of continuity and tense should be placed within square brackets too. Any changes made in the quoted text in terms of adding of a word or a phrase within the quoted material should be placed within square brackets. If a word or a phrase within the quoted material has been italicized by the author to render emphasis, it must be indicated by adding [emphasis mine]. The error/s in the quoted materials is/are to be retained but such retentions must be indicated by [sic] that is inserted immediately after the retention.

  5. Op. cit., Loc. cit., idem, are not used within the SHSS style.

  6. Though the SHSS allows both British and American variations in spellings. However, the authors are directed to consistently follow either of the two throughout.

  7. Names of texts or articles in the main body of the manuscript should be italicized and neither underlined nor put within quotation marks.

  8. Numbers are to be provided in figures if they are representative of exact measurement or series of quantities (10 Kgs). However, all numbers below the numeral 100 are to appear in words if they are a part of general description (There were about ten people were present in the scene.) Though decades are to be referred in figures (the 1990’s), the centuries are to be spelt out in words (the twentieth century). Dates follow the format “date month, year” with the month spelt out in a non-abbreviated form (14th November 2014). Authors are to use ‘per cent’ or ‘percent’ within the text and the symbol ‘%’ is to be used only within tables and charts.

  9. Hyphenation of words should be consistently maintained throughout the text. Authors are to use a hyphen to maintain the distinction between a noun and an attributive adjective. For instance, ‘the Fifteenth Century’ while used as a noun, but ‘fifteenth-century Lucknow’ while used as an adjective.

  10. For any quotation used in the text in a language other than English, the author is to provide a translation in English which is to follow the quotes immediately within parenthetical brackets before the in-text parenthetical citation of the source material. If the translation is not the author’s own, a citation to the translation should appear as well after the citation of the source material. The citation to the translation is to be separated from the citation of the source material with a ‘;’ and then prefixed by ‘trans.’. 

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